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Making Links Accessible in Moodle

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When a screen reader sees a link… it verbalizes the word: link before reading the linked text. The linked URL may not be read, so users exploring pages in this way may not be able to tell exactly where a link leads.

  1. Log in to Moodle and navigate to the desired course.
  2. Enter the desired activity or resource that contains the link you wish to change.
  3. Click the Actions Menu (gear icon) in the top-right and select Edit Settings.
  4. Locate the text you wish to make an accessible link. Make sure the linked text states everything the reader needs to know—without the surrounding text for context. You may need to adjust your wording to make sure the linked URL destination is clear.
  5. Highlight the text (or click within an existing link) and click the link button (chain icon) in the page editing controls above the text field.
  6. Paste the desired URL in the Enter a URL textbox.
  7. Click the Create link button to apply the link.
  8. Repeat as desired for any other links on the page.
  9. Scroll to the bottom of the page.
  10. Click the Save and return to course button to save your changes.

Examples:

Good

You may want to check out the Clackamas Community College website for more information.
A Screen reader would:

  • announce this sentence something like: “You may want to check out the link Clackamas Community College website for more information.”
  • or be listed in a non-visual navigation menu as: “Clackamas Community College website”

For the best experience in Moodle you’ll want to use the Chrome (download) or FireFox (download) web browsers rather than those that come with your computer like Edge, Internet Explorer, or Safari.
A Screen reader would:

  • announce this sentence something like: “For the best experience in Moodle you’ll want to use the link Chrome download or link FireFox download web browsers rather than those that come with your computer like Edge, Internet Explorer, or Safari.”
  • or be listed in a non-visual navigation menu as: “Chrome download” and “Firefox download”

Why are these good?

These links on their own inform the reader exactly where that link will take them if they click on it and if they’ll need to open that link in a new application.

Bad

You can find the college website at this link.
A Screen reader would:

  • announce this sentence something like: “You can find the college website at link this link”
  • or be listed in a non-visual navigation menu as: “this link”

Find the college website here.

A Screen reader would:

  • announce this sentence something like: “Find the college website link here.”
  • or be listed in a non-visual navigation menu as: “here”

Neither of these Bad examples provide any context as to where the links will take a reader. The reader would need to attentively listen to any and all surrounding text again to figure out anything about the links.

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